All in the family

Jayson Hoover

jayson hoover

uncle jay as he is known by myself and my cousins. this album is amazing. i dont know a lot about past Vancouver, though i would love to know more. this piece of history also features jayson’s brother on the drums, lou hoover. lou hoover’s daughter and son are known Vancouver rappers, Shay Faded and RC the hazard. Jayson Hoover’s son is PK Love, the vocalist on the ‘it ain’t easy/welcome to eastvan’ song that i put out featuring Nine Tre(my brother), mars and edge.
download the mp3

Anyways. props to december from teamcream.ca for buying this at the vinyl swap meet. im glad to have a piece of vancouver history and a family heirloom.

i never thought vancouver had some soul/funk like this before. i know that back in the day we had ‘hogans alley’ and the smiling buddah cabaret, which had an amazing neon light. Vancouver used to be known for our neon lights. too bad they are mostly gone… i love neon lights.

hogan’s alley

Hogan’s Alley was the local, unofficial name for Park Lane, an alley that ran through the southwestern corner of Strathcona in Vancouver, British Columbia during the first six decades of the twentieth century. It ran between Union and Prior Streets from approximately Main Street to Jackson Avenue.

While Hogan’s Alley and the surrounding area was an ethnically diverse neighbourhood during this era, home to many Italian, Chinese and Japanese Canadians, a number of black families, black businesses, and the city’s only black church, the African Methodist Episcopal Fountain Chapel, were located there. As such, Hogan’s Alley was the first and last neighbourhood in Vancouver with a substantial concentrated black population. A possible reason these families settled there was because of the close proximity to the train stations since sleeping car porters were predominantly black men.

Prior to 1935, Hogan’s Alley was a red light district, owing to Mayor L. D. Taylor’s “open town policy,” which was that police resources would be concentrated on major crimes, not victimless vice crimes. As a result of this policy, illegal drinking establishments, brothels, and gambling dens operated here, as they did in various other non-white sections of town like Chinatown and Japantown. This policy also earned Taylor a reputation for being soft on vice crime and he faced accusations of corruption. This was the basis of his electoral defeats in 1929 and 1934. Hogan’s Alley long outlived Taylor’s career in civic politics until it faced demolition to make way for a freeway.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

6 Responses to “All in the family”

  1. Meghan Says:

    wow Robbie, GREAT read.

    I was unaware of Vancouver’s soul/funk history. I would love to get my hands on some local 60/70’s gems.

    One of my favourite Van motown bands from the late 60’s is “Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers”. I wish I could have been alive to catch one of their shows at the Blues Palace. Do you think your uncle Jayson Hoover ever played there?? Damn, I wish people documented things like we do now-a-days….

  2. mandela Says:

    Jimi Hendrix would spend his childhood summers at his grandmama’s on Hogan Alley..

  3. werd Says:

    meghan, youre right, were pretty fortunate to be able to document like we do now. thats why i try to document as much as POSsible.
    Bobby Taylor and the vancouver is great, there are a lot of talented groups that came out of vancouver. Tommy Chong of cheech & chong was a member of Bobby Taylor and the vancouvers!!

  4. moves Says:

    bird used one of the songs for a past song , the start of it went, when i was a kids i grew up on the eastside of this city, that record is dope.

  5. Meghan Says:

    Yah I knew about Tommy Chong. It was interesting how many names that band had, it started out the “Calgary Shades”, then “Little Daddy & The Bachelors”, at one point it was even “Four N*gg*rs and a Ch*nk” (shortened to Four N’s and a C”)…. Finally it was changed to “Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers and stayed that way until they disbanded.

    I’m a big fan of Bobby Taylor, he had a huge influence on the Jackson 5 being that he was their first producer (although he didn’t get any credit for it). Bobby wasn’t Canadian but he sure put “the Vancouvers” on the “motown” map so to speak.

    of everything my dad taught me in my life, the biggest thing that has stuck is all the oldies music trivia we did on family vacations….. funny the things you remember a decade later (and the things you don’t haha).

  6. Les Clarke Says:

    Nice to see that people still remember I was the roadie for Jayson Hoover and Stuff on the across canada tour. The band was very special to a lot of people including myself. The style of funk was hard edged and intricate as well as soulful, each member was a master on his own, But best of all it got people on their feet. I miss it……….. time to get the funk outta here ! and back in the clubs where it belongs. I am so happy to see that a lot of the rap scene has incorporated funk into their own. Those who carry on after will spawn a new
    funk and carry the legend on.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: